General Surgery

General Surgey, Hernia Repair, Gallbladder Surgery, Colorectal Surgery, Stomach/Intestine Surgery, Solid Organ Surgery, Wound Care, Endocrine Surgery, Breast Surgery

Back to Top ↑

General Surgery

About General Surgery

What is general surgery?

General surgery focuses on organs in the abdominal area including the esophagus, stomach, small bowel, colon, liver, pancreas, gallbladder and bile ducts. General surgery is also performed for diseases of the skin, breast, soft tissue and hernias.

According to the American Board of Surgery, “General surgery is a discipline that requires knowledge of and familiarity with a broad spectrum of diseases that may require surgical treatment. By necessity, the breadth and depth of this knowledge will vary by disease category. In most areas, the surgeon will be expected to be competent in diagnosing and treating the full spectrum of disease.”

Required training

Due to the complexities of general surgery, these highly trained specialists complete a general surgery residency of up to six years, followed by a more specialized fellowship of approximately three years.

Technological advances

Many procedures that once involved open surgery and long, difficult recoveries are now performed by minimally invasive general surgery. In addition, modern technology has led to the development of robotic surgery.

When performing robotic surgery, general surgeons are aided by a robotic machine with two arms that hold equipment, and another with a 3D video camera that allows the surgeon to view high-definition, magnified images. Robotic surgery offers significant benefits including a minimally invasive incision, high-level surgical precision, less pain and blood loss, and a faster recovery time.

Our world-class surgeons

Patients who choose Advanced Surgical Solutions can be confident that they will be treated by board-certified general surgeons who are also proficient in the latest robotic surgery techniques.

Hernia Repair

  • What is a hernia?

    The abdominal wall has areas of potential weakness where hernias can develop. A hernia occurs when an organ or fatty tissue squeezes through a weak spot in a surrounding muscle or connective tissue. The most common types of hernias are inguinal (inner groin), femoral (outer groin), incisional (resulting from an incision), umbilical (belly button), and hiatal (upper stomach). Approximately 96 percent of all groin hernias are inguinal, and men are more susceptible to them because of a natural weakness in this area.

    Characterized by severe pain, a hernia cannot heal on its own and requires corrective surgery. When there is a tear in the wall of the abdomen, lining tissues push to the opening resulting into a painful bulge. If you notice one just under your skin, it may be time to book an appointment to have it corrected. Signs of a hernia are excessive pain when you lift objects, when you cough continuously, when urinating or when you stand or sit for long periods. Apart from the pain, a hernia may pose other greater dangers to your health.

    Hernia procedure

    To repair a hernia, the surgeon at Advanced Surgical Solutions performs a procedure called laparoscopic hernia repair. After making a small incision around the area of the hernia, he will view the area through telescopes and use special mesh material to patch the opening and completely seal it.

    After the surgery, you will be monitored in the recovery room for an hour or two, until you are fully awake. When you are awake and able to walk, you will be able to go home.

    Although you will probably experience some soreness during the first day or two, you should be able to return to your normal daily activities within a short amount of time. With laparoscopic hernia repair, there will usually be less postoperative pain than with traditional hernia surgery. In addition, you may have a faster return to a solid-food diet and a quicker return of bowel function.

    The main complications of any operation are bleeding and infection, which are uncommon with laparoscopic hernia repair. Also, repaired hernias may reoccur. It is important to discuss possible complications with your surgeon before you undergo hernia repair, or any other procedure.

Gallbladder Surgery

  • The gallbladder and gallstones

    The gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped organ located on the right side of the liver. Bile, or digestive juice, is released from the gallbladder after eating and assists with digestion. Bile travels through the bile ducts to the small intestine. Sometimes gallstones – small, hard masses consisting mainly of cholesterol and bile salts – can form, blocking the flow of bile out of the gallbladder.

    This blockage causes the gallbladder to swell. Symptoms can include sharp abdominal pain, vomiting, indigestion and fever. If a gallstone blocks the common bile duct, the skin can become jaundiced. It is not known why certain people form gallstones and there is no known prevention.

    Treatment for gallstones

    Once gallstones are formed, they do not go away by themselves. They are sometimes managed temporarily with drugs or dietary adjustments, such as reducing fat intake. However, this treatment has a low and short-term success rate. Symptoms eventually resume unless the gallbladder is removed.

    At Advanced Surgical Solutions, surgeons perform laparoscopic gallbladder removal called Cholecystectomy. It involves making four small incisions in the abdomen instead of the usual five- to seven-inch incision made during an open gallbladder surgery. With laparoscopic gallbladder removal, patients usually have minimal postoperative pain, go home in one day and experience a faster recovery.

    Although most laparoscopic gallbladder patients experience few or no complications, there are risks involved with any surgery that should be discussed with your surgeon.

Colorectal Surgery

Includes colon resection, rectal resection, hemorrhoids treatment, anal fistula surgery, anal fissure treatment

  • The colon and rectum

    The small intestines, which are attached to the stomach on one end and to the colon on the other, are responsible for the absorption of nutrients in food. The colon, otherwise referred to as the large intestines, holds waste matter after food has been digested. Finally, the waste matter passes to the rectum to be expelled from the body.

    Various disorders of the gastrointestinal tract require surgical treatment. At Advanced Surgical Solutions, we have surgeons who are skilled in colorectal surgeries including colon resection, rectal resection, hemorrhoids treatment, anal fistula surgery and anal fissure treatment.

    Colorectal surgery

    At Advanced Surgical Solutions, surgeons perform colorectal surgeries using a technique known as minimally invasive laparoscopic colon surgery. With this technique, many common colon procedures can be done through four or five small incisions. A laparoscope, which has a small telescope attached to a camera, allows the surgeon to view a magnified image of the patient’s internal organs on a monitor.

    Advantages of laparoscopic colon surgery over traditional open surgery may include less postoperative pain; a shorter hospital stay; and a faster return to a solid-food diet, bowel function and normal activity.

    Even with laparoscopic surgery, there are risks involved. Discuss them with your surgeon before the procedure so you are prepared to recognize any early signs of possible complications.

Solid Organ Surgery

Includes surgery of the liver, spleen, adrenal glands and kidneys

  • Overview

    Various diseases can affect the liver, spleen, adrenal glands and kidneys, which require surgery. A portion, or all, of a solid organ may be removed if the organ contains a tumor, is hyperactive or is not functioning properly.

    There are a variety of surgical treatment options for solid organ disease. Surgeries that previously required large incisions and extended recovery time including splenectomy (removal of the spleen) and adrenalectomy (removal of one or both adrenal glands) can now be performed laparoscopically

    Solid organ surgery

    At Advanced Surgical Solutions, surgeons experienced in solid organ surgery perform various laparoscopic procedures. A laparoscope, which has a small telescope attached to a camera, allows the surgeon to view a magnified image of the patient’s internal organs on a monitor.

    Advantages of laparoscopic solid organ surgery over traditional open surgery may include less postoperative pain; a shorter hospital stay; and a faster return to a solid-food diet, bowel function and normal activity.

    Even with laparoscopic surgery, there are risks involved. Discuss them with your surgeon before the procedure so you are prepared to recognize any early signs of possible complications.